15 Great Parenting Podcasts

By sara / September 22, 2016

Information on parenting is vast in our high-tech culture. Books, magazine articles, and websites all boast the latest, greatest parenting knowledge, and it can be overwhelming to weed through all of the words to find the true nuggets of wisdom.

Another method of learning is podcasts, specifically those about parenting. In 15 minutes to an hour parents can listen and get advice, stories, or just laugh as they plug in on their ride to work or while doing chores around the house.

Since parenting podcasts are abundant in number, I’ve chosen the top 15 that are worth a listen for parents.

Ranking Reasons: Any list of favorites is going to be subjective, but I used the following guideline to help me make my choices for best podcasts related to parenting: 

  • Reviews from other listeners​
  • Applicability to most parents
  • Need based on the specificity of the audience(One in a Million Baby, for example)
  • Usability of advice offered
  • Frequent inclusion on best podcasts lists for parents

The Boob Group is, not surprisingly, a podcast about all things breastfeeding. It’s a part of New Mommy Media, and they include expert interviews and list specific goals for each episode. Sunny Gault leads the way as the host, and she is a lactation consultant who emphasizes the importance of supporting all moms, no matter how they choose to feed their kids.

A panel of moms are included in each podcast, so the discussion is coming from many different people, and listeners are more likely to connect with the style and tone of at least one of the moms on the panel. The topics covered are not generic. While there are basic topics that the group discusses, they also take on less common breastfeeding situations, like wet nursing and breastfeeding adoptive children.

The tone of the show is nonjudgment. It’s informative while still being fun. Plus, if you’re a breastfeeding mom, you can listen to an episode while your child nurses!

Though Manic Mommies is no longer producing new episodes, there are 405 to listen to and enjoy. Erin Kane and Kristin Brandt offered a podcast that gave advice on how to do it all without losing your mind. They interviewed Elizabeth Edwards and author Jane Porter. Parenting coach, Kathy Surro and pediatrician, Dr. Robert Lindeman round out the cast of this witty show.

Moms who feel overextended and need solid advice and a good laugh will benefit from tuning into these shows. Manic Mommies episodes have received almost four million downloads, and their advice still resonates with moms, even though the last episode recorded was in 2014.

Birthed from a painful experience, Tessa Prebble founded this podcast when her daughter, who died before turning one, was born with severe disabilities. Prebble used the isolated feeling she was experiencing to make sure other parents of children with disabilities and health issues wouldn’t feel alone.]

Parents of children with special needs share their stories through interviews, and no topic is off limits. While the show can be inspiring due to the camaraderie of these moms supporting each other, the episodes discuss the devastation of having a child with chronic problems, some that lead to death.

Though this podcast will not cover issues every parent deals with, I included it because of how necessary it is for the parents who need it. Prebble has created a safe place for those struggling with a specific, dark set of problems to feel safe and accepted. She’s a beacon of light for those one in a million parents.

Though the name implies a new age feel, Zen Parenting is easily relatable for any parent. The idea behind the show is that parents who have self-realization will be better for their kids. Cathy Cassani Adams and Todd Adams are the married hosts who balance each other out. She is the emotional core while he is the logical view.

Topics include how to deal with pain, why words and images matter, and staying internally peaceful to promote peaceful behavior on the outside. Though some of the topics go deeper into emotional analysis than most of us usually venture, they are tempered with topics that are informative without being over analytical. Tune in and get your Zen on with these very compatible hosts.

Comedians Elizabeth Laime and Vanessa Ragland offer an honest parenting podcast focused on discussing the true plethora of emotions associated with being a parent. They define themselves as “unqualified” advice givers, but their podcast is popular because their answers are so real.

This podcast is mainly for entertainment purposes, though it does deal with real questions listeners have and the advice can be sound. At the end of a long day of being mom, this is the go-to podcast to laugh and get some perspective. It’s entertaining, and the hosts are women you’d like in your mommy circle of friends to chat and have a drink with.

We want our kids to learn, and one great way to help them be life-long learners is to give them access to and appreciation of great books. Host Sarah MacKenzie wants to help us on the reading journey. Her podcast shares the best books to read to our kids aloud, and she emphasizes the power of parents reading to children. Parents reading to kids builds their reading skills and fosters a desire for reading.

The podcast explores what books to choose for kids of different ages, how to make kids socially aware through books, and how to build a household where kids are avid readers. Her tips are simple and readily applicable, and her tone is one of a friend and bibliophile.

Executive Lynn Corolla, who is also the wife of comedian Adam Corolla, and parenting author Stephanie Wilder-Taylor cover a range of topics during what will be the funniest hour of your day. This comedic pairing offers occasional interviews with famous guests, and the topics the hosts discuss range from irreverent to thought provoking.

While the tone is entertaining, the hosts are also not afraid to get personal about their lives raising kids. The fact that this podcast is hosted by moms doesn’t mean it won’t offer entertainment and insight for dads. It’s humorous and topics range from political to pop culture.

Biz Ellis and Theresa Thorn warn parents not to listen to this podcast with their kids because there will be swear words. This podcast is for adults only, and it is hilarious. Ellis and Thorn share the truths of what it’s like to be a parent. As opposed to painting the parenting experience as 24/7 magic, they share the realities of raising people with their own minds and opinions and the challenges that involves.

The episodes tend to run over an hour, but they are so enjoyable that it doesn’t feel that long. Guest hosts are invited on to discuss specific parenting topics, and though the tone is relaxed, the topics are relevant and the insight important. Get ready to laugh before you press play on this one.

Christian Perez hosts this podcast about mindful, conscious parenting. I can’t think of any parent who wouldn’t benefit from the approaches presented on this podcast. The goal is to help parents connect with their children and raise them without power struggles.

Topics include how to get away from using bribes and punishments to motivate and to instead build a relationship with your child that helps them understand how to treat others and feel valued.

Experts and authors come on the show to talk about self-care, raising confident children, and the emotions children have and how to deal with them. The hosts and guests are honest. This is not a podcast that hides the difficulties of parenting. Instead, because of how difficult it can be, Little Sprigs offers ways to parent peacefully in a way that respects your child and helps you feel more peaceful about parenting choices. It’s informative and powerful with insight to spare.​

6. Quiet

Susan Cain is the author of the bestselling book <u>Quiet</u>, and her podcast specifically deals with how to raise introverted kids in a world obsessed with noise and extroversion.

Classified as a self-help podcast, Cain includes research, interviews with parents, and interviews with kids who define themselves as introverts. Her goal is to help parents understand and appreciate their introverted kids so they can help them thrive in the world, not in spite of their introversion but because of it.

As a mother of an introverted child, The Long Runway is my personal favorite. Cain takes the time to reinforce that introverts are normal and don’t need to be fixed, just understood. She also helps parents recognized the signs of an introverted child and discusses the long runway method to help introverts, a way of understanding and accepting that they need more time to prepare for most events.

The Long Runway is a great intro if you have questions about what traits an introvert exhibits. Cain reinforces that introverts quiet temperaments are normal and make them successful, not something they have to overcome. Cain’s style is informative, and her voice makes the podcast relaxed and easy to listen to.

Allison Benedikt and Dan Kois, parents and editors at Slate, are the mom and dad in this scenario. Though they do not have children together, they do have a great rapport and are humorous and informative.

During each podcast, they cover triumphs and fails in their own parenting lives. This section is personal, honest, and relatable. They take calls from listeners and deal with difficult questions to help other parents navigate through the journey. Guest hosts are also invited on to discuss specific issues, and the Mom and Dad Recommend portion gives listeners a chance to hear what Allison and Dan recommend for the week.

The set-up for this show works, and both hosts have voices that are calm and measured. This podcast is for any parent who likes to laugh while also being informed.

4. Spawned

Kristin Chase and Liz Gumbinner are hilarious, and this podcast is fun and down-to-earth. The founders of Cool Mom Picks offer a non-judgmental approach that will provide moms with a safe place to go to laugh. However, their episodes are not just fluff. They offer insight and information on up-to-the-minute issues without ever using a condescending tone.

One of the biggest complaints of those who reviewed them on podbay was that they just wanted more episodes because these ladies are so enjoyable.

Their first episode about technology use is intelligent and fun, and it’s a great way to get to know the hosts and their style. The consensus from listeners is that it’s a blast to hang out with these ladies.

Hillary Frank, the host of this podcast, is a great center for a show that covers a variety of parenting topics. Special guests are interviewed by Frank and share narratives of their lives about parenting. The vibe is very NPR-like, and this podcast feels intellectual yet approachable.

Sex is not a topic that is off-limits, which for most of us is great since sex changes after kids. There don’t seem to be any taboo topics; everything is on the table and handled in a mature, entertaining way. Episode 89 features Katie Couric discussing motherhood after the death of her husband, and The Longest Shortest Time is known to reel in big guests like Couric on a fairly regular basis.

You don’t have to be Supermom, but it doesn’t hurt to have a few tricks up your sleeve. The Mighty Mommy’s Quick and Dirty Tips for Practical Parenting podcast offers just that. Cheryl Butler boasts the ability to choose relevant problems most moms have and break them into solutions using small, readily applicable steps. She tackles everything from simplifying schedules to how to say farewell to a child leaving for college.

Butler is serious about her tips being quick. Each episode is only about 10-12 minutes. Episode 578 offers tips about how to be more mindful of negative speech, and Butler provides stories and research to drive her points home. It’s a must-hear for any parent.

Janet Lansbury takes the knowledge she used to write parenting books and shares it with her listeners on Unruffled. Specifically geared towards the parents of toddlers, Lansbury helps parents deal with common toddler issues by teaching them to respect their child’s feelings while still guiding them towards appropriate behavior. Her approach helps parents feel like they are setting and enforcing reasonable limits while also lovingly raising their children during one of the hardest parenting phases.

Lansbury’s voice matches the title of her podcast. It’s smooth and even, and her advice to her listeners is spot-on and encouraging. Her episodes are generally around 15 minutes, though they can go longer or shorter. Lansbury is a voice of calm encouragement to parents who need it.

These are the parenting podcasts worth your time and attention. No matter what stage of parenting you’re in, you’ll find a podcast on this list that will suit your needs.